Top 14 Best Work Boots For Landscaping And Outdoor Projects

Hey there. Welcome to our round-up of the best work boots for landscapers for 2022. 

In A Rush?!

Overall, The Best Safety Toe Work Boots For Landscapers

We’ve put together a list of the top 14 most popular work boots models for landscaping, and our #1 recommendation based on what we’ve found in our research is the Georgia Lace-To-Toe boots.

To bring you this article we’ve researched over 36 websites, looked at 44 different work boot brands and models and we have read dozens of customer reviews and feedback for each make of boot that made the cut, as well as a few that did not. 

Overall we’ve spent over 59 hours looking into all of these work boots for landscapers to bring you the most important information for each boot. 

In this article, you’ll learn about which are some of the newest and the most rated work boots for landscaping workers, what features to look for, what to avoid, and much more.

So keep reading. There’s a lot of good info in here…

You can jump straight into the landscaping work boots reviews section or go to the Q&A section first (if you want to learn more about this).

These are the top 14 best boots for landscaping work

Here’s a quick comparison table if you’re curious about which work boots I’ve included in today’s round-up.

1. Georgia

  • Waterproof
  • 100% leather
  • Steel toe

Best Landscaping Safety
Toe Work Boots

2. Chippewa

  • Waterproof
  • 100% leather
  • Steel toe

Best For Landscapers Working In Rough Terrain

3. KEEN

  • Water
  • Leather + textile
  • Soft toe cap

Breathable Hiking Style Boots For Landscapers

4. Wolverine

  • Water-resistant
  • 100% leather
  • Soft toe

Slip-On Work Boots For Landscapers

5. Wideway

  • Water-resistant
  • Nylon + suede
  • Soft toe

Affordable Military Style Boots For Landscape Work

6. Caterpillar

  • Not waterproof
  • 100% leather
  • Steel toe

Wellington Work Boots
For Landscaping Work

7. Ariat

  • Not waterproof
  • 100% leather
  • Soft toe

Western Style Boots For Landscape Workers

8. Servus

  • Waterproof
  • PVC
  • Steel toe

Cheap Waterproof Work Boots For Landscape Work

9. Timberland

  • Waterproof
  • Leather
  • Alloy toe

Safety Toe Hiking Style Boots For Landscape Work

10. Carhartt

  • Waterproof
  • Leather
  • Composite toe

Composite Toe Work Boots For Landscaping

11. Irish Setter

  • Waterproof
  • Leather
  • Composite toe

Heat Resistant Work Boots For Landscapers

12. Thorogood

  • Waterproof
  • Leather
  • Composite toe

Work Boots With Composite Toe For Landscapers

13. Danner

  • Waterproof
  • Leather & Cordura
  • Plain toe

Tactical Style Boots For Landscaping Work

best Red Wing work boots for landscaping

14. Red Wing

  • Waterproof
  • Leather
  • Composite toe

Heavy Duty Boots For Landscaping Workers

Know this first about landscaping work boots

Most important features of a work boot for landscapers

1. Comfort

Comfort is a key feature with this type of work. Lightweight and comfortable boots seem to be the most popular.

2. Different soles for different landscapers

Depending on what type of landscaping you’re doing, you might need different types of soles on your work boots.

So for example, some of the boots in this round-up have a more aggressive sole with deep lugs that are better for you if you do more tree planting and digging.

Others are flatter with little to no lugs. Those are better if your work as a landscaper involves more slab laying, and paving patios.

3. Shank

Again, it’s not a requirement but if you hit the shovel a lot and most landscapers do use a lot the shovel or the spade, you’ll eventually start to feel pain or fatigue in your feet arches.

A shank, preferably a steel one, will help dissipate the shock that’s created by the impact of repeatedly hitting the shovel when digging.

So it’s a good feature to look for in a work boot for landscaping work.

4. Ankle support

If you have weak ankles, one of the most important features to look for in a landscaper work boot is ankle support. Especially if you work mostly on rough and unleveled surfaces.

Some of the boots in this round-up will provide you with that. Especially if you go for the 8inch tall work boots.

What to avoid when buying work boots for landscaping work?

I would suggest avoiding nubuck or suede work boots if you’re doing landscaping.

They are high maintenance, in that they need to be cleaned and treated regularly to get the best out of them. Even then, any nick in the material can ruin them.

Smooth leather is more naturally water-repellent and is much easier to treat and polish. Having said that, on smooth leather work boots scuffs and scratches are much more visible than on nubuck leather work boots.

Depending on what kind of landscaping you’re doing, heavy boots can be tiring and uncomfortable to wear all day.

If doing lighter work like planting or turfing, you could get away with light boots without toe protection (unless mandatory on particular work sites).

Whereas concreting, excessive digging, cutting of materials like metal and concrete, and walking on rough terrains, etc would require heavier, more sturdy boots with all the protection.

I wouldn’t recommend Wellington work boots, because they’re not that practical for these tasks.

You might think that having a high shaft these boots are better when dealing with mud and soil and all that.

But many times I had my feet stuck into soft ground as I was digging and as I was trying to get my foot out I found myself bootless.

What’s the best place to buy work boots for landscaping?

Online is so quick and easy and gives so many options. But local hardware shops give the beauty of seeing and feeling the boots, trying them on, and walking in them.

They also give the option of quicker and easier replacements if the chosen boots don’t feel right when home.

Here are a few stores you might be familiar with:

  • Amazon
  • Payless
  • Sears
  • Walmart
  • Red Wing

Reviews of the top-rated outdoor work boots for landscaping workers

a team of landscapers working on planting a new tree in a garden. They all wear work boots that are good for landscaping work

Alright, let’s jump into some detailed reviews of each one of these landscaping work boots we’ve included in today’s round-up and learn a bit more about each one of them.

1. Georgia G8341

Lace-To-Toe Work Boots For Landscapers

Georgia has been making boots since 1937, so they know what they’re doing. These 8” lace-to-toe specimens look mighty fine and sturdy.

There are mixed reviews on comfort. Some say these boots are very comfortable. Others say they niggle around the ankle area. Whether this problem remains after they’ve been properly worn in remains to be seen.

The fact that they don’t benefit from the comfort of insulation might also be another reason for the chaffing around the ankles.

Don’t let the lack of insulation bother you though. It can certainly make your feet sweat in the summer. Waterproofing can also do this, but general consensus shows that these beauties don’t give that problem.

If you really do want insulation, the Georgia G8040 8 M is a very similar boot that provides it.

One thing I noticed is that the company states the top lugs for the laces WILL NOT come out. The jury is out on this bold statement.

Boots I’ve had with this style have all had the odd broken lug. However, these ones could be special. All in all, these boots seem to be very well-liked.

PROS

  • A one-year limited warranty, and guaranteed six months of waterproofing
  • A steel shank in the sole for extra protection for the feet
  • Lots of ankle support
  • Withstands 18,000 volts of electricity at 60 hertz

CONS

  • Not insulated. Not a big con but for landscapers working in cold weather, it would’ve been nice to have insulation

2. Chippewa Logger

Best Work Boots For Landscapers Working In Rough, Wet, Soft Grounds

One of the top work boots we found people like to wear when doing landscaping, especially on soft ground is this Chippewa 9” logger style boot. 

That’s because they come with a higher heel than other work boots and they also have a Vibram outsole with deep lugs which is always great for a good grip and traction when you’re digging holes to plant trees or big plants.

It has many reviews stating that they are “Worth every penny!” and the “Best boot I’ve ever owned!”  These work boots are built with work in mind.

One complaint that kept popping up is that the lace hooks tend to come away. I’ve found this myself with similar style hooks.

Other than that, if you’ve been looking for a great work boot that provides ankle support and helps you through a long work day in rough terrain, this boot is highly recommended by many.

If you like this style of boot you can check out these logger boots and logger-styled work boots to discover what other models are available out there.

PROS

  • Waterproof
  • Thick insulation, which is great for the winter. Yet thin enough for freedom of movement.
  • A logger heel for climbing
  • Good traction for many terrains, especially in wet conditions
  • Withstands 18,000 volts of electricity at 60 hertz

CONS

  • Might be too narrow for wide feet

3. KEEN Voyageur

Best For Landscapers That
Don’t Need Safety Toe Cap Work Boots

Weighing only 16.2 ounces (that’s 453.9 g in new money), these boots are very light, which is great news if you’re working in them all day (as most of us do).

They use PFC-free substances for the water-repelling, so for any of you who are super conscious about the environment, these would be a good fit for you. See what I did there? Good fit… Never mind. I’ll grab my coat. 

They are not waterproof, so might not be suitable for the landscaper who doesn’t like having wet feet.

Also, water repellents only last so long in this type of work so might need to be cleaned, maintained, and resprayed regularly to let the water run off the duck’s back. By the way, here’s how to waterproof your work boots if you want to learn more).

A great plus is that reviews say they are very comfortable. And they do look it. We all hate being on our feet all day with blisters or pinched toes and lumps digging in our ankles.

PROS

  • Lightweight
  • Good ventilation, and because of the lack of waterproofing, the feet don’t sweat too much. They stay cooler.
  • Very comfortable
  • They have a good grip

CONS

  • Rubber toe caps can crack, and some workplace safety officers may insist on steel toe caps as they can resist more extreme drops and shocks


4. Wolverine Romeo I-90

Best SLip On Work Boots For Landscapers

These are a very good-looking pair of slip-on boots. Wolverine has worked hard on making them comfortable.

Also, with the double layer of waterproofing, and the anti-slip soles protecting from oil slippage and whatnot, they’re quite a catch.

There has been some confusion from buyers about the toe protection, whether they are composite or protected at all.

The soft toe might only be suitable for the soft-landscaper, who wants comfort over protection, rather than the hard-landscaper, who doesn’t want their toes crushed or cut doing heavy-duty work, like concrete cutting, slab laying, etc.

With a 4.5 star rating over 859 Amazon reviews, they are definitely up there with the best-rated slip-on boots in this price range.

PROS

  • Easy to slip on and off
  • Slip-resistant
  • Waterproof. (A full leather upper and a breathable membrane)
  • New EPX anti-fatigue technology, making them comfortable
  • Two loops help pull them on more easier
  • Quite light

CONS

  • Not as much ankle support as a laced boot.
  • Not much toe protection

5. Wideway Tactical

Lightweight Jungle Boots For Landscape Work


These 8” lightweight tactical jungle boots are a good choice for people who want ankle support doing light landscaping in the summer.

They look good, wear in quickly, and have a lace system that makes them easy to get on and off, which can sometimes be “problemental” with high boots like this.

They don’t seem like proper military boots. More likely styled as such. They are water-resistant, rather than waterproof as stated in the Amazon description, and they don’t have toe protection.

This might not be a problem. I know many landscapers, including myself years ago, who only wear trainers to work, but this wouldn’t be permitted on some building sites. 

They are great for summer, because of the lightweight material, and the side air vents to keep the feet cool, but probably wouldn’t recommend using them in the winter months.

Some reviews say they are of suede material, so this will need to be taken into consideration. ie durability, maintenance, etc.

A great plus is flexibility, which is useful with high boots because stiff leather high boots can sometimes be very restricting. In fact, I once got problems with my Achilles’ tendons after wearing proper standard-issue army boots for work.

A 4.5 star Amazon rating over 908 reviews certainly isn’t to be sniffed at.

PROS

  • Lightweight
  • Good ankle support
  • Good for wide feet
  • Side air vents to keep feet cool
  • Steel shank

CONS

  • Not actually waterproof, even though they are advertised as being so
  • Little or no toe protection

6. Caterpillar Revolver

Great Pull-on Wellington Style
Work Boots For Landscaper


With Cat Footwear being a leading provider of footwear, it’s understandable that these construction boots have a lot of reviews. And a 4.5 star rating holds them in good stead.

They are recommended more for summer wear, as they have no insulation or waterproofing. You will probably want to treat them with a water-repellent before wearing them out in the rain. 

A great plus with pull-on boots is that there’s no faffing around with laces, but some can be difficult to get on and off. With the wide top, and handles on both sides, this isn’t a problem with these boots.

Lots of reviews say that they come up quite big, so suggest ordering maybe half a size or a size smaller. They also say that these don’t last quite as long as others. This might want to be taken into consideration.

They’re not the cheapest pair of work boots, but are definitely not in the high price bracket, so replacing them more often for not too much expense could be a reasonable trade-off if you like this type of boot.

If you like this type of boots for work check out these other great pull-on work boots to see what else is popular.

PROS

  • Steel toe-capped
  • Slip-resistant
  • Easy to pull on and off
  • Steel shank

CONS

  • Not waterproof or pre-treated with water repellant
  • Don’t tend to last as long as others

7. Ariat Groundbreaker

Cowboy Style Work Boots For Landscapers


Howdy partners. We got a rootin’-tootin’ show in stall for y’all here. The Ariat Groundbreaker Square Toe Western doesn’t get much more western.

Stick some spurs on and you’ll be saying ‘Get off your horse and drink your milk’ in no time.

But are they good enough to lay turf in or plant your flower beds? They’re certainly described as being great for farming.

This is good if you get oil leaks from plants because you’ll stay on your feet long enough to ride another day.

These are described as toe protection boots, but I can’t see any evidence in the description or reviews that show they have protection.

Also, the only waterproofing they have is the full leather outing. How long can this hold the water out after constant wear and tear?

These boots are great for landscapers with wide feet since the square toe cap allows more inside the boot than round toe caps.

If you like western-style work boots check out these Justin work boots as well for more inspiration.

PROS

  • Oil and slip-resistant
  • Easy to clean
  • Pull-on and off easily
  • Comfortable (Four Layer Rebound technology giving extra cushioning)
  • Supportive shank

CONS

  • Not waterproof

8. Honeywell Servus

Waterproof Steel Toe Work Boots For Landscapers

Choosing to wear Wellington boots is a toss-up between cost, practicality, and the task they’re used for. These 14” PVC boots are very cheap.

But then for the price, you sacrifice other things. ie, comfort. Having worn these types of boots regularly, they are not designed to be worn all day.

Mud can stick in the treads, making them heavier than they already are. And because they are fully waterproof PVC the feet can sweat a lot since this type of material is not breathable.

Also, flexibility can be a problem because of the height and material. Although, these do come with a scalloped line near the top for easy flexing.

I would say they are task-specific boots to be worn temporarily, for things like concreting (because they are 100% waterproof and resistant to chemicals), and any task that means having to wade through water and thick wet mud.

The beauty is the mud can be banged off when dry, or it can be hosed down quickly and easily without getting the insides wet.

If your purse strings are tight, they are a good option, although not necessarily an all-around boot. But they can be replaced easily if worn out too quickly.

They have a lot of positive reviews, particularly from farm workers. They should be listened to. If anyone knows how to work hard, it’s them.

PROS

  • Steel toe-capped
  • Flexible
  • Very affordable
  • 100% waterproof
  • Slip-resistant

CONS

  • Little ankle support
  • Prone to cause sweating feet

9. Timberland PRO Hyperion

Lightweight Safety Toe Hiking Style Boots For Landscaping

Timberland knows what they’re doing, right? It would seem so. These Timberland PRO 6” Hyperion give a 4.5-star rating out of nearly 2,800 Amazon reviews at the time I wrote this round-up.

Most of them say how comfortable these are, which is a testament to the anti-fatigue shock-absorbing system that delivers energy back to the foot. 

The Vibram sole gives lots of grip, especially against those oils and slippery surfaces. And the toe-box is light with titan alloy protection.

There is also a composite shank in the sole for extra support which is great for a landscaper that hit the shovel all day. The shank will prevent pain in your arches from digging using a shovel.

The lightweight factors, though, don’t give way to the fact that, although considerably lighter than the Timberland Boondocks or the Timberland Pit Boss (2 widely known models) they are widely stated to be quite heavy, which is certainly something to think about if planning on wearing them all day.

The comfort and anti-fatigue technology might well make this bearable. Usually, heavy boots are made to be very durable, but various reviews complain of them not lasting too long.

As is common with Timberland, these boots are pleasing to the eye and very popular. Discover other popular work boots from Timberland PRO if you like this brand.

PROS

  • Protected from electrical hazards
  • Oil and slip-resistant soles
  • Waterproof membrane
  • Comfortable

CONS

  • There’s a lot of seam stitching on these. That makes a cool-looking boot but it might affect the durability

10. Carhartt Rugged Flex

Lightweight Safety Toe Hiking Style Boots For Landscaping

With nearly 2000 Amazon reviews over 8 years, these leather boots seem to have sold well. Although, not quite as well as others widely known work boots brands like Timberland.

With an 8-inch shaft, they offer sufficient ankle support. Although, the higher lace lugs are of the type I’ve experienced that tend to break after time.

After scouring the reviews, there don’t seem to be any complaints about this with these boots. There are a few complaints, however, of the boots debilitating too much after only a few months of wear.

In particular, the soles coming away, mainly at the toes. That’s a very common issue of the cemented sole boot. Yes, they’re lighter and more flexible than Goodyear welted work boots but they tend to fall apart faster.

Also, even though they are fitted with 3M insulation, many customers have complained that they’re not warm enough. If you work in cold temperatures make sure this boot has enough Thinsulate for your environment.

These have 400grams of insulation which is not enough for below-zero conditions but will be enough for cold days.

Additionally, the boots come with a safety composite toe cap which is better in this context since it won’t transfer cold from outside into your boots as a steel toe cap would.

PROS

  • Protected from electrical hazards
  • Oil and slip-resistant soles
  • Waterproof membrane
  • Comfortable

CONS

  • There’s a lot of seam stitching on these. That makes a cool-looking boot but it might affect the durability

11. Irish Setter Crosby

Landscaping Work Boots With
Heat Resisting OutSole

If you think these boots are covered in fur, have a long, flappy tongue that will lick your face, and make your feet run after foxes and rabbits in the woods, then you’re barking up the wrong tree.

They are just normal boots, made out of 95% leather and a whisker of synthetic material. That synthetic stuff is a great plus.

It’s a supposedly tough Armatec covering that goes over the toe area, which helps expand the lifespan of the boot. Ideal for people like me who, as mentioned earlier, use the toe box for leverage when digging and kicking things into place.

I know some people like to use tarmac to create walkways in their massive gardens. If you have to work on hot tarmac and hot surfaces these boots will keep your feet safe thanks to the heat-resistant outsole.

They have a clever moisture management lining that keeps the feet dry. The toes are protected with a composite toe cap. That seems satisfactory enough unless you want them to do tricks and fetch your paper.

The reviews are of a very mixed bag, with contradictory statements about topics about comfort, waterproofing, ease to wear in, and durability.

So it’s difficult to make a solid judgment based on those. All I will say is, if you treat them nicely, clean them, pet them, and give them a treat every now and then, you’re likely to get a lot of good use out of them.

PROS

  • Electric hazard rated
  • Non-metallic safety toe
  • Anti-scuff toe reinforcement
  • Heat resistant sole

CONS

  • Avoid them in cold seasons and also on slippery surfaces. They don’t grip too well in that type of environment

12. Thorogood Infinity

Landscaping Work Boots With
Heat Resisting OutSole

If you think these boots are covered in fur, have a long, flappy tongue that will lick your face, and make your feet run after foxes and rabbits in the woods, then you’re barking up the wrong tree.

They are just normal boots, made out of 95% leather and a whisker of synthetic material. That synthetic stuff is a great plus.

It’s a supposedly tough Armatec covering that goes over the toe area, which helps expand the lifespan of the boot. Ideal for people like me who, as mentioned earlier, use the toe box for leverage when digging and kicking things into place.

I know some people like to use tarmac to create walkways in their massive gardens. If you have to work on hot tarmac and hot surfaces these boots will keep your feet safe thanks to the heat-resistant outsole.

They have a clever moisture management lining that keeps the feet dry. The toes are protected with a composite toe cap. That seems satisfactory enough unless you want them to do tricks and fetch your paper.

The reviews are of a very mixed bag, with contradictory statements about topics about comfort, waterproofing, ease to wear in, and durability.

So it’s difficult to make a solid judgment based on those. All I will say is, if you treat them nicely, clean them, pet them, and give them a treat every now and then, you’re likely to get a lot of good use out of them.

PROS

  • Conform to ASTM electrical hazard resistance standards
  • Waterproof
  • 3M Insulation. Great for the winter
  • Composite safety toe
  • Composite shank

CONS

  • At 4.6 pounds, heavier than most.

13. Danner Arcadia

Tough And Resolable Work Boots
For Landscaping Workers

Sometimes you can look at a pair of shoes or boots and know they’re going to be comfortable but tough at the same time.

So when reading lots of reviews saying these 8-inch work boots are going to last for years, I believe them.

And many people are of the opinion they are very durable with the majority of owners saying that the boots might be a bit stiff for the first few days.

But once the boots break-in, they’re very comfortable, especially for landscapers working on soft, wet, rough terrain.

That’s because they provide great ankle support and also they come with a Vibram outsole that’s great for those of you doing landscaping in these types of environments.

One thing you must know is that these work boots are expensive so they’re not for everybody’s pocket but if you have the budget the quality is there.

Another great thing about these boots is that they’re re-craftable and resolable. You’ll have to talk to a cobbler or to Danner to see how much it costs though to see if it compensates you.

A full recraft of the boot won’t be cheap but maybe if you just resole them you might be able to get another 2 years extra out of the boot. Resolling a pair of work boots might cost you somewhere in the region of $100.

PROS

  • Waterproof
  • Fiberglass shank
  • Vibram sole
  • Ankle support
  • Resolable

CONS

  • They don’t come with a safety toe cap

14. Red Wing Burnside

Tough And Resolable Work Boots
For Landscaping Workers

I find that nubuck leather needs to be looked after much more than shiny leather boots. These Burnside 6” nubucks look nice, but whenever I wear nubuck boots, I worry about scuffing or scratching them.

Red Wing does provide extreme abrasion resistance in the toe and heel areas of these boots, but what about the rest?

Of course, as a landscaper, I know it’s impossible to keep my work boots in nice condition especially when I was planting trees, plants, and bushes, and being in wet, soft soil all day.

The outer soles are manufactured to withstand surfaces with high levels of heat, and the Vibram used is claimed to have great traction and be resistant to abrasion in lots of environments, giving these the makings of a good all-round boot.

Some reviews support these claims, and some oppose them, saying that after a few months of all-day wear, the soles have worn out.

Again, subjectivity is key here. Sometimes you just have to take the risk and see for yourself.

The boots are also waterproof. Not only do they have a waterproof bootie to create a barrier for water to stay out of your boots but also the leather itself is treated to be waterproof.

PROS

  • Waterproof
  • Electrical hazard proof
  • Composite toe cap
  • Rubber toe shield
  • Heavy duty

CONS

  • There are a few complaints of stitching coming away by the heels.

Choosing good work boots for landscapers: The Takeaway

Generally, leather boots are the most popular because of easy maintenance. However, my former boss, who I worked for many years as a landscaper and groundworker, insisted on wearing nubuck Caterpillar boots.

I found that comfort and insulation was the most important thing for me. Also, I used to rest the corner of slabs on the toes when laying patios and levered the spade against the toe when digging.

This inevitably caused wear and tear much quicker. Now, not everyone would use these techniques, but maybe people who do could consider a rubber toe covering as we’ve seen in some of the work boots in this round-up.

To summarize, most people in the reviews are looking for comfort, durability, waterproofing, and some toe protection, although not essential.

It’s important to know exactly what jobs you’re going to use the boots for to analyze these factors against price. For example, soft landscaping is different from hard landscaping, therefore needing different requirements.

I hope this information is helpful. Good luck in your search for the best work boots for you. Let us know if you have any suggestions or questions in the comments below.

Georgia boots which has been voted the best steel toe work boot for landscaping

Overall, The Best Safety Work
Boot For Landscaping


Team Members Working On This Page

Jimmy Webb – Writer And Researcher

Hey, Jimmy here. I’m one of the researchers and writers here at BestForMyFeet.com.  I’ve been wearing work boots all my life working as a forklift driver, landscaper, groundworker, and now a tower crane operator so I know a thing or two about footwear. I’m also working on my first novel. So writing is my passion. When I’m not writing I love to spend time with my wife, two children, and furball.

Victor Adrian – Editor And Webmaster

Construction Professional, driver, crane operator, cleaner, head chef … these are just some of the jobs I did in the past. Working in all these different environments taught me that having good footwear to protect your feet from different dangers at work IS PARAMOUNT for any worker! On this website, I aim to share all my knowledge and personal experience in dealing with different footwear and foot care issues, and hopefully, you can get something out of it. Enjoy!


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